Monthly Archives: August 2013

The NSA is Worried About its Sysadmins. But isn’t Everyone?

Plans to reduce admin numbers by 90% have probably been misunderstood

A year ago, few beyond the realms of computer security, politics and journalism had even heard of the US National Security Agency (NSA) let alone could explain what it did. Then the Edward Snowden affair happened and suddenly one of the world’s most secretive organizations overnight turned into one which has had its every action and statement pored over with huge fascination.

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Whose job is it to watch the Admins?

Administrators, privileged network deities or just a type of ordinary network user much the same as anyone else?  Years into an age where IT security has become a mainstream topic, this remains the sort of polarizing question that can provoke one of two reactions; shock or relief.

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Enhanced User Experience in Privilege Guard v3.8

Privilege Guard’s UAC Replacement Extends to MSI Packages

For quite some time we have supported Windows Installer packages, empowering standard users to run MSI’s, MSU’s and MSP’s that would require administrator privileges to complete. This functionality is fundamental in most least privilege deployments, where power users are delegated the privilege of choosing their own productivity tools.

We worked closely with our customers to understand how we can improve this offering, and came up with some additional use cases. We listened, and we delivered a much better user experience in 3.8.

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Beware the USB Stick!

Privilege Guard v3.8 introduces Drive Rule

The Drive Rule is a new validation rule that lets you match applications being executed from particular types of drive.  Not too dissimilar in concept to the file path rule (where applications are matched based on their directory location), the drive rule lets you target the drive itself.

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New Ways to Reduce the Risk of Admin Operations

Remote Administration of Servers and Desktops with Least Privilege

Microsoft PowerShell is an essential tool to manage and administer servers and desktops in the enterprise.  As time passes, an increasing array of Microsoft Windows operating system components and Windows applications are being automated through PowerShell cmdlets.  Since PowerShell has a secure remote connection capability, administrators work from their own computer to manage many remote machines.  However, this efficient administrative practice requires IT Staff to have admin rights on hundreds or thousands of desktops and servers in the organization.

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