WannaCry One Week On

It’s been a busy week in the security world. On Friday 12th May 2017 the world was hit by one of the biggest ransomware out breaks in recent times. It reached 74 countries and more than 45,000 systems. By Monday, this was more like 150 countries and 200,000 systems, according to Europol. When a kill-switch was found to disable the virus, it was a matter of hours until new variants were infecting systems at a rate of 3,600 per hour.

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WannaCry Ransomware goes global

On Friday, a cyber attack on an unprecedented scale struck a wide range of organizations in over 99 countries across the globe. The ransomware attack, known as WannaCry or WannaCrypt0r shut down IT systems in NHS hospitals and GP surgeries in the UK as well as many large global organizations including Telefonica, FedEx and Renault.

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Focus on the fundamentals: Intel Security and Avecto make a powerful force

For nearly a decade, Avecto’s customers have relied on Defendpoint to underpin “traditional AV”, next generation AV, machine learning and advanced network-based analysis solutions. Despite notable advances, detection will never reach 100% efficacy.

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2017 – The year of social engineering-as-a-service?

Social engineering is the use of psychological tools such as deceit, misdirection, manipulation and flattery to elicit unauthorised information or access to systems. Social engineering is an increasingly common way for criminals to attack organisations as it does not always rely on cyber vulnerabilities but rather takes advantage of the weakest element in an organisation, human beings. People are susceptible to social engineering because these attacks exploit social norms and human nature, including reciprocity, curiosity, and pride. As we become increasingly connected – at work, at home and intertwining the two – the opportunities and impacts of social engineering are increasing.

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How to dismantle an atomic bomb

Security researchers at enSilo recently released a novel code injection technique for Windows known as ‘Atom Bombing’. This is so called because it exploits Windows atom tables and Async procedure calls (APC) to evade detection by many common security solutions.

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