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Contributor:
James.Maude
January 12th, 2015

Return of the Macro

Just like fashion, malware goes through trends and comebacks, so let’s take a look at what’s ‘in’ this season. Anyone involved in IT in the 1990′s will remember a few things; plaid shirts, floppy disks and macro viruses. Although I can’t envisage the former two making a comeback any time soon, macros are definitely back on the InfoSec agenda, something Microsoft has been highlighting recently.

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Nothing comes for free: Just say no

Sometimes when you’re involved in developing software, a developer offers you a feature or an option “for free”. Most typically, this is part of a framework, plugin, or library that offers this functionality anyway: they view it as easier to leave in than to take out.

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Stakeholders rock: Guides, not barriers

At the end of October last year, I attended NUX4, a conference for people involved in working to deliver better experiences (mainly digital ones).

One of the key themes of the day was about how we can achieve better outcomes by working effectively and collaboratively with stakeholders, rather than viewing them as barriers to getting things signed off.

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Trident tours: Pastures new for Avecto

This week, Avecto moved into a new UK home just outside Manchester Airport – the brand new office, called Trident, is three times the size of our old premises. It’s the culmination of months of planning and follows new Avecto offices in Frankfurt, as well as a move from Cambridge, Boston to Somerville, MA to accommodate growth in the states.

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Take a long hard look at your shelfware

Twenty-eight percent of security spending is wasted on shelfware, according to CSO’s news article earlier this year.

Shelfware, in case you don’t have any of your own, and aren’t familiar with the term, is a word coined by the technology industry to refer to something that is purchased but is never put in to production.

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Striking the right chord: Don’t make your users incompetent

There is very rarely progress without some cost. I was reminded of this recently by the news that a new piece of railway line – the Ordsall Chord – will cut off the world’s first passenger railway station, Manchester Liverpool Road, from the main line and affect 30 other “heritage assets”.

While changes to user’s experience of software products is rarely as substantial or irreversible as this, the same concept applies: even improvements have a cost. And that cost is, very often, to your current users.

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