Tag Archives: privilege management

Taking COMmand of your Privileges

Least privilege was first put forward as a design principle by Jerry Saltzer and Mike Schroeder 40 years ago [1]. Avecto, along with many others, has championed least privilege and our 5 reasons to love least privilege shows that it is key to mitigating attacks.

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Are admin rights the biggest threat to enterprise security?

Last week saw the launch of the latest Microsoft Vulnerabilities Report, Avecto’s leading research project into the security bulletins issued by the software giant over the past 12 months. Now in its third year, the report has consistently provided intriguing insight into today’s threat landscape, the common attack vectors and the products within the Microsoft portfolio that cause IT departments the most sleepless nights.

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Why elevating the issue won’t always alleviate it

“We’ve done it!” – The majority of your users have admin rights removed, meaning your environment is far more secure than it was before and you’ve successfully mitigated 85% of critical vulnerabilities in Windows. But are you as secure as you think? A surprisingly common pitfall that we come across in the support team are those who, either intentionally or unwittingly, elevate everything. Everything.

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Microsoft Vulnerabilities Report 2015 – What you need to know

Now in its third year, the 2015 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Report analyses the data from Security Bulletins issued by Microsoft throughout 2015. Typically issued on the second Tuesday of each month, these “Patch Tuesday” bulletins contain fixes for vulnerabilities affecting Microsoft products. With the launch of Windows 10, this approach changed slightly, with patches being released as soon as they are available.

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Path of enlightenment part 2 – Taking tasks to task

As discussed in my last blog the issue of unquoted paths for services has been around for over 15 years. Despite this there is another potential privilege escalation with unquoted paths which doesn’t get as much coverage, these are Scheduled Tasks.

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